2013/23 : Outside

Though it looks like the summer is finally finding its way to the sun-forsaken plains around the mighty green Danube, the stream of reasons not to go outside is still running strong. This week’s most plausible excuse to despise fresh air and stay cave-bound comes from Gridlok and Prolix and is called Membrane. To my little surprise issued by the usually not quite so heavy RAM Records, this insane cavalcade of broken triplets floating on an avalanche of bass is likely spring’s biggest track thus far, and if you liked Gridlok’s Insecticide (-and frankly, who didn’t?-) you will love this one too. On the flipside comes the massive Babylon with the grace of a flying brick, and that’s not the only aspect the two have in common. And even though I find myself more attracted to the filigree proceedings of Membrane, sometimes there’s no denying a good bashing. And that’s a thing to be had from both sides alike.

Gridlok & Prolix – Membrane / Babylon (RAM Records)

Those looking for a subtler edge in their aural environment should seriously consider Prague-based producer Subtension’s newest output on Samurai, another package that favours the digital listener by feeding him the -in my opinion- single’s finest track exclusively. Both versions however come with the groovy Black Haze and even groovier Changes, and while the latter stands out with its distinct funkiness and smooth breaks, the former satisfies with its lush basses and flow. But as I indicated before, the main course is not served until Inner Man is on the plate (-and will yet never be…): A genuine interplay of ravaging rhythms and startling surprises, interwoven with an eerie jigsaw of melodies and reverb and spiced with a thick end on the chestside, Inner Man tells a story that I just can’t seem to get enough of.

Subtension – Black Haze (Samurai Music)



On the deep end of today’s spectrum we have Philth and his Submarine, a track whose title actually says all about its abyssal undertakings: it’s low, it’s heavy, it’s metallic, slightly scruffy on the outside and if you get claustrophobic you’re most certainly lost in this big, slowly evolving mass. On the other side of AutomAte’s newest issue there’s Wreckless’ Who So Ever, and calling that tune the Yin to Philth’s Yang makes good sense to me: Who So Ever pretty much blasts the aforementioned spectrum to tiny pieces with its no-nonsense attitude and basses so saturated with fat it literally comes dripping from the speakers. (No really, it’s quite messy listening to this tune.) Equipped with a compelling melodic minimalism and pretty decisive drums too, the whole package is truly worth a try – no matter if you prefer drowning or exploding.

Philth – Submarine / Wreckless – Who So Ever (AutomAte Recordings)

In case you ever wondered what Godzilla would have sounded if it weren’t a giant lizard-thing but a monstrous duck, the answer lies within Mako, Villem and Fields’ newest contribution to Texas based Warm Communications’ catalogue of fine art: Whatever Whatever is not only one of dnb’s favourite attitudes, it’s also the title to the reese-based procedures the skilful trio unfolds with the tune whose intro brought that dreaded picture to my mind. It’s not a bird song however, and that mere notion badly wrongs the frantically smooth and beautiful epic. On the flip there’s Mako’s solo venture I used to be like you, a more laid-back and atmospheric track that emphasizes percussion and sub, though sometimes does so at the expense of tension. But -to close the circle and this little revue- if you ask me, still a pretty good reason not to go outside.

Mako & Villem ft. Fields – Whatever Whatever / Mako – I Used To Be Like You (Warm Communications)

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